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• Lynde Point Light is also known as "Saybrook Inner Light."

• The original Lynde Point Light was a 35-foot wooden tower. Considered "too short" and "too dim" by mariners, it was replaced with a 65-foot brownstone tower in 1838.

• The late actress Katherine Hepburn owned a home close to Lynde Point and Saybrook Breakwater Lighthouses.

• Lynde Point Light is not accessible by land. It can be seen from vantage points along the shore but is best viewed from the water.

• A lighthouse to mark the entrance to Old Saybrook Harbor and the Connecticut River started with the purchase of land from William Lynde for $225.

• "Much too noisy" was the public's complaint about the 1,000-pound fog bell installed at Saybrook Breakwater Light in 1889. It was replaced by a smaller bell — and ultimately — by foghorns.

• Over 150 species of migratory birds use Faulkner's Island. Most notably, it is the Northeast's largest breeding area for roseate terns. Island access is restricted during mating season (May to August).

• A large sandbar at the entrance to Old Saybrook Harbor plagued its development as a seaport. Jetties and a dredged channel built in the 1870s helped.

• Saybrook Breakwater Light, built with $20,000 appropriated by congress in 1882, marks the west jetty.

• The Saybrook Breakwater, or Saybrook Outer lighthouse is the Connecticut icon seen on the state's special license plates

• On September 21, 1938, the Saybrook Breakwater light keeper noted that "a light southeast breeze" had sprung up. That breeze became the worst recorded hurricane in New England's history.

• The Hurricane of 1938 left only the tower at the Saybrook Breakwater Light intact. The storm swept everything else, including a 1,5000-gallon kerosene tank, into the sea.

• In 1888, Congress approved $15,000 for the construction of several beacons along the Connecticut River including the Essex Reef Post Light (Hayden's) and the Chester Rock Post Light.

• The Essex Reef Post Light and the Chester Rock Post Light were both tended by local lamplighters.

• Chester Rock remained active into the 1930s; Essex Reef was demolished and replaced by a skeleton tower light in 1919.

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